Raw Eggs and Salmonella

Vintage Poster Re Raw Eggs And Salmonella ConcernsVintage Incubators Poster

The link between eggs and salmonella is a modern health concern. Some of Grandma's old fashioned dessert recipes call for uncooked, raw eggs or egg whites and care must be taken. Below you will find Important Instructions for adapting the vintage recipes to modern, safe cooking practices.


How Safe are Your Eggs?

If a few simple precautions are taken concerning eggs and salmonella, making homemade beverages like eggnogs and vintage egg creams; and uncooked desserts like ice creams, frozen cream puddings, and candy can be a safe and rewarding experience for the entire family to enjoy.

When Grandma's vintage recipes were published back in the 19th century that called for raw eggs, it was safe for people to eat them. No one ever gave a thought about a possible link between eggs and salmonella.

However, a strain of Salmonella bacteria called enteritidis found its way into the ovaries of chickens and eventually into their eggs during the latter half of the 20th century. These bacteria can also be placed on the outside of the shell as it exits the hen's body.

Eggs with Salmonella look and taste entirely normal, and it is very difficult to tell which eggs are infected. It's even difficult to know how many are infected.

Depending on what report you read, experts estimate from one in every 700 to one in every 20,000 eggs are infected with the bacterium Salmonella enteritidis.

The Eggs and Salmonella Risk

Although the risk of getting an infected egg is somewhat low, the odds are that you will eventually get one. For some, eating that wrong egg can simply mean an upset stomach or uncomfortable diarrhoea, but for others the results can prove much worse, and in rare situations salmonella food poisoning can be life threatening.

Those at most risk include young children, pregnant mothers, unborn babies, the elderly, and people with impaired immune systems. The link between eggs and salmonella needs to be taken seriously.

Because of the salmonella risk, Canadian and United States government agencies recommend that people do not to eat raw eggs or uncooked food made from them.

In their fact sheet titled Egg Products Preparation the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommend that "no one should eat foods containing raw eggs. This includes … foods like homemade mayonnaise, ice cream, or eggnog made from recipes in which the egg ingredients are not cooked."

It is no longer worth the risk to consume raw egg products!

To Be Safe from Bacteria

All raw eggs and egg-containing foods must be cooked to reach 160°F (71°C). Recipes that call for uncooked eggs must be adapted to use precooked eggs. The only other safe alternative is to use pasteurized egg products or egg substitutes.

Egg Substitutes

Egg substitutes are an available alternative to raw eggs.

Egg Replacer™

A Powdered, egg-free vegetarian product to replace eggs in most recipes. This product brand is sold at some food stores. Camping and wilderness outfitters often carry similar brands.

Whipped Cream

Whipped cream may be freely substituted for whipped egg whites in many recipes.

Pasteurized Egg Products

Pasteurized egg products are an excellent alternative to raw eggs.

Pasteurized Eggs

The eggs are pasteurized right in the shell using a patented all-natural process to kill the bacteria effectively so that salmonella is no longer an issue. Pasteurized eggs are completely safe to use uncooked; however, they are not widely available in food stores yet.

Powdered Eggs, Egg Yolks and Egg Whites

These products are pasteurized and are a good substitute when uncooked eggs, egg yolks, or egg whites are called for in a recipe. You can whip reconstituted egg white powder similar to fresh egg white.

These products are sold at some food stores along with supplies for cake baking. Camping and wilderness outfitters may also sell powdered egg products.

Refrigerated Liquid Eggs and Egg Whites

These products are pasteurized and are an excellent substitute when uncooked eggs or egg whites are called for in a recipe. They are sold at most food stores along with refrigerated dairy products.

One brand sold at our local supermarket packages two 250-mL (1-cup) containers of liquid eggs in a small carton. Since each 250-mL container holds the equivalent of 5 whole eggs, you get the equivalent of 10 eggs in a carton for around the same cost as one dozen fresh Grade-A Eggs.

Each 250-mL container of liquid egg whites holds the equivalent of 8 egg whites, so you actually get the equivalent of 16 egg whites in a carton for around the same cost as one dozen fresh Grade-A Eggs. The cost is very reasonable, and the product is excellent.

How to Adapt Your Recipes

Since it is unsafe to eat uncooked eggs or egg whites, and since some vintage recipes call for raw eggs that are not cooked, to avoid any risk associated with eggs and salmonella you must adapt your recipes as follows:

Whole Eggs

You may precook the eggs in a saucepan by combining them with either some sugar or liquid from the recipe. Cook over a low heat, stirring constantly, until the egg mixture reaches 160°F (71°C) or coats a metal spoon or the blade of a knife with a thin film. Once the egg mixture is cooked, place the saucepan in cold water and continue to stir until the mixture is cool, and then proceed with the recipe.

Note: As an alternative, you may substitute powdered eggs or refrigerated liquid eggs by carefully following the package directions. Both products are pasteurized and may be used in recipes like regular eggs.

Egg Yolks

You may precook the egg yolks in a saucepan by combining the yolks with some liquid from the recipe. Cook over a low heat, stirring constantly, until the yolk mixture reaches the temperature of 160°F (71°C) or coats a metal spoon or the blade of a knife with a thin film. Once the yolks are cooked, place the saucepan in cold water and continue to stir until the mixture is cool, and then proceed with the recipe.

Note: As an alternative, you may substitute powdered egg yolks or refrigerated liquid eggs by following the package directions. Both products are pasteurized and may be used in recipes like regular eggs, thereby eliminating any concerns about salmonella.

Egg Whites

Hint

Whipped cream also serves as an excellent substitute for egg whites in some recipes, thereby eliminating any concerns about an eggs and salmonella risk.

You may precook the egg whites carefully in a saucepan by combining the whites with some sugar and water from the recipe. Cook over low heat, beating constantly, until the egg white mixture reaches 160°F (71°C). Pour into a bowl and beat rapidly until the whites stand in soft peaks. You must use some sugar with the whites to keep them from coagulating too quickly. Unfortunately, there is no way to look at the eggs and tell when they are done, so you must use a cooking thermometer if you want to ensure accuracy.

Note: As an alternative, you may substitute powdered egg whites or refrigerated liquid egg whites by following the package directions. Both products are pasteurized and may be whipped and used in recipes like regular egg whites.

In recipes where many egg whites are called for, refrigerated liquid egg white is the best alternative to using whole eggs, since there are no yolks to waste or use.

When it Comes to Eggs and Salmonella,
It's Better to be Safe Than Sorry!

I hope you'll find the information about eggs and salmonella helpful when cooking, especially when old fashioned beverage and dessert recipes call for the use of raw eggs. Remember: It is better to be safe!


You May Also Like







Custom Search



Enjoy a Laugh to Brighten Your Day!

Abbott and Costello

Listen to Bud Abbott and Lou Costello's "Who's On First?" skit from the World War 2 Special Services Division V-Disk.

(5: 54 min.)


Comments

Have your say! Leave a friendly comment about Grandma's old fashioned desserts in the box below. (No links or promotion please.)


Like This Page? Please Share It




Visit the Homemade Dessert Recipes Home Page

Old Fashioned Rose Cookbook Icon

Donald Bell is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. If you make a purchase through a link on this page, I may receive a small commission to help support this site — at no extra cost to you. Thank you.

Don Bell with Old Fashioned Recipes

Please click the Like button above and help me preserve Grandma's old fashioned recipes in their original form.


Mystery Quiz

Mystery Item

What is this antique item? The Answer is found below.


Recent Articles

  1. Bake Homemade Pie Pops Today

    Make your own flaky, golden pie pops and surprise your friends and family with a truly yummy dessert treat that's easy to make and fun to serve.

    Read More

  2. Vintage Dessert Cake Recipes

    You will love these old fashioned dessert cake recipes for when you want to serve something that's proven to be delicious and different.

    Read More

  3. Basic Homemade Cake Recipe with 12 Variations

    You'll love this basic homemade cake recipe with simple variations for making up to 12 vintage dessert cakes.

    Read More

  4. Straight Soda Recipes from the Vintage Soda Fountain

    Use these authentic straight soda recipes to make old time soda fountain beverages that are totally refreshing and delicious.

    Read More

  5. Vintage Ice Cream Shake Recipes

    These authentic ice cream shake recipes will remind you of the old soda fountain at the local diner. Make rich, frothy shakes in the flavor of your choice.

    Read More


Favorite
Topics


Quiz Answer

Grandma's button hooks for  fastening tight buttons on leather boots and gloves.